Resource Compendium: Domestic and Family Violence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Resources: Domestic and Family Violence

Information | For Services Providing Support Around Domestic Violence | For Other Services

Information

  • Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) (2010) Family Violence - A National Legal Response. ALRC Final Report 114. [pdf]

    From the Terms of Reference: "The 2009 report of the National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children, Time for Action, acknowledged the complex interraction between State and Territory family/domestic violence and child protection laws and the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth). The National Council also stressed the importance of consistent interpretation and application of laws relating to family/domestic violence and sexual assault, including rules of evidence, in ensuring justice for victims of such violence. At its meeting of 16 - 17 April 2009, the Standing Committee of Attorneys-General agreed that Australian law reform commissions should work together to consider these issues."

  • Australian Law Reform Commission (2012) Family Violence - Improving Legal Frameworks. ALRC Final Report 117. [pdf]

    From the Terms of Reference: "I refer to the Australian Law Reform Commission for inquiry and report, pursuant to subsection 20(1) of the Australian Law Reform Commission Act 1996 (Cth), the issue of the treatment of family/domestic violence in Commonwealth laws, including child support and family assistance law, immigration law, employment law, social security law and superannuation law and privacy provisions in relation to those experiencing family/domestic violence. I request that the Commission consider what, if any, improvements could be made to relevant legal frameworks to protect the safety of those experiencing family/domestic violence."

  • Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) (2012) Family Violence and Commonwealth Laws - People with Disability Information Sheet. [html] [pdf]

    From the Fact Sheet: "This information sheet discusses the ALRC Commonwealth Family Violence Inquiry and briefly outlines some of the ALRC's key recommendations aimed at better protecting the safety of people with disability who are experiencing family violence. Further detail about these recommendations can be found in the Final Report, Family Violence and Commonwealth Laws - Improving Legal Frameworks, ALRC Report 117 (2011). The ALRC uses the term 'people with disability' to reflect each person's value, individuality, dignity and capabilities. 'People with disability' is used rather than 'people with a disability', acknowledging that a person may have more than one disability."

  • Judith Cockram (2003) Silent voices: Women with Disabilities and Family and Domestic Violence. Western Australia: People with Disabilities (WA) Inc, Ethnic Disability Advocacy Centre (WA) and Centre for Social Research, Edith Cowan University. [html]

    From the Introduction: "Family and domestic violence is widespread and complex. It is a major issue which results in substantial personal, social, financial and health related costs... However, there has been very little research on domestic violence against women with disabilities. The risk for abuse that women with disabilities face, the direct and indirect effects of abuse on their health, and their barriers to seeking help remain largely undocumented. In addition, information about the experiences of abuse that women with disabilities face across cultures, disability types, and locales is extremely limited."

  • Department of Human Services (2012) Family Violence Risk Assessment and Risk Management Framework and Practice Guides 1-3. Government of Victoria. [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "Increased understanding of family violence and what constitutes an effective response has resulted in important reforms to family violence service delivery. Victoria has been investing in the development of an integrated family violence system (IFVS) since 2005. As a result, Victoria now has a whole-of-system approach that places women and children at the centre of the response. Reforms to the system include innovation to the justice system and an integrated approach that incorporates both specialist family violence and mainstream service providers. This manual aims to support a consistent approach for assessing and managing family violence."

  • Family Court of Australia and Federal Magistrates' Court of Australia (2013) Family Violence Best Practice Principles. [Assistive Technology compatible pdf] [doc] [rtf]

    From the Introduction: "Protecting families and particularly children who are engaged with the family law system from the effects of family violence is a priority for the Family Court and the Federal Circuit Court. The revised Family Violence Best Practice Principles assists in this critically important task by acting as a checklist of matters that judges, court staff, legal professionals and litigants may wish to have regard to at each stage of the case management process in disputes involving children. The Best Practice Principles were released by the Attorney-General in March 2009 and a revised version, encompassing both the Family Court and the Federal Circuit Court, was launched by the Attorney-General in July 2011. This third edition of the Family Violence Best Practice Principles takes into account recent amendments made by theFamily Law Legislation Amendment (Family Violence and Other Measures) Act 2011 (Cth), the preponderance of which came into effect on 7 June 2012."

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For services providing support around domestic violence

  • Healey, L., Humphreys, C. & Howe, K. (2013) Inclusive Domestic Violence Standards: Strategies to Improve Interventions for Women With Disabilities. Violence and Victim, Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. 50-68. [html]

    Abstract: "In this article the authors use a matrix tool to identify minimum standards needed to support the inclusion of women with disabilities within existing domestic violence sector standards. Eight domestic violence codes, standards and guidelines currently in use in Victoria were identified and analysed. It was found that there were major gaps in knowledge, policy and practice that will need significant resourcing to improve services to women with disabilities. For example, only one document that was analysed acknowledged disability as a risk factor increasing the likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. It was also found that only one of the documents indicated that data about a client's disability status was to be collected and no document required the collection of data about the clients' support needs. The authors identify a number of areas for future research and advocacy."

  • Cathy Hoog, (2004) Increasing Agency Accessibility For People with Disabilities: Domestic Violence Agency Self-Assessment Guide. Abused Deaf Women's Advocacy Services, for the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "Providing domestic violence services to people with disabilities challenges our thinking about the experience of abuse and our strategies for reform. We can be proud of Washington State and its excellent policies against abuse. We are doing enough, it would seem, but it is not enough for people with disabilities. There aren't many practical tools available for domestic violence programs for improving accessibility. The Coalition developed this tool specifically for you to increase your program's ability to work with people with disabilities. By increasing our capacity to work with victims who have a disability, we engage in creative and resourceful advocacy with every individual who seeks justice and safety. This self-assessment guide is intended to assist domestic violence programs in evaluating their accessibility to victims with disabilities in their community." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • Cathy Hoog (2003) Model Protocol On Screening Practices For Domestic Violence Victims With Disabilities. Abused Deaf Women's Advocacy Services for the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "The goal of this protocol is to support domestic violence agencies in the State of Washington in examining and revising their intake and screening process to include questions about disability issues. Inquiring if a victim has a disability that requires accommodation gives the program information that enables them to provide appropriate accessible services." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • Cathy Hoog (2010) Model Protocol Safety Planning for Domestic Violence Victims with Disabilities. Abused Deaf Women's Advocacy Services for the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence. [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "The goal of this protocol and recommended policies is to support domestic violence agencies: to strengthen and increase their safety planning services to people with disabilities and; to advance self-determination for people with disabilities by offering safety planning that is cognizant of environmental and social barriers." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • Nancy Smith and Sandra Harrell (2011) Forging New Collaborations: A Guide for Rape Crisis, Domestic Violence, and Disability Organizations, Center on Victimization and Safety. VERA Institute of Justice. [pdf]
  • From the Introduction: "Domestic violence programs, rape crisis centers, disability organizations, and criminal justice agencies are increasingly recognizing that people with disabilities who have survived violence or sexual assault cannot be effectively served in their communities if victim services and disability organizations continue to work in isolation from each other. Across the country, communities are finding that the solution comes from combining the expertise of victim services and disability organizations. As a result, these organizations are joining forces, sharing expertise and other resources to improve their individual and complementary responses to survivors with disabilities. This report is about lessons learned from these collaborations." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (1996) Open Minds Open Doors Technical Assistance Manual to Help Domestic Violence Service Providers to Become Physically and Attitudinally Accessible to Women with Disabilities. National Coalition Against Domestic Violence. [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "The purpose of this manual is to provide domestic violence service agencies with basic guidelines on how to reach out to and work with women with disabilities. Working with battered women with disabilities required recognition of the unique factors which disability brings to domestic violence. Advocates working with women with disabilities need to be well informed about the effects disability can have on a woman's perception of herself, her life, her independence, her relationships, her options, her choices and the domestic violence itself." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • NSW Women's Refuge Resource Centre (1999) An Open Door NSW Women's Refuge Movement Access & Equity Manual. NSW Women’s Refuge Working Party. [pdf]

    From the Foreword: "The NSW Women's Refuge Movement is proud to present its Access and Equity Manual for member refuges in NSW. The NSW Women's Refuge Movement is dynamic. The professional level of service we deliver today has evolved through our 25 years of experience. The Movement remains committed to providing consistent, quality support and advocacy for women and children escaping domestic violence and will always respect women and children's rights to privacy, informed consent, confidentiality and safety. The Movement agrees that this manual will be a living document, as services continue to develop, change and improve into the future."

  • Thunder Bay Independent Living Resource Centre, Canada (2003) What to do When: A Manual for Women with Disabilities who have been abused. [doc]

    From the Manual: "Women are the subjects of many types of violence and abuse. Women with disabilities can be even more vulnerable because they are often seen as "easy targets". Sometimes crimes are committed by strangers, but more often women with disabilities are victimized by someone they know; a close relative, or other person who takes care of them. Abuse is wrong, and these types of crimes must be stopped... The information here will help to explain what abuse is, what steps you can take to protect yourself. Words you might not understand are defined in the glossary. The justice system can be confusing, so to help you understand, the information will be presented as a story." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • Family Violence Reform Coordination Unit, Victoria (2009) Family Violence Risk Assessment and Risk Management: Information Sharing in the Context of Family Violence Fact Sheet. [doc]

    From the Fact Sheet: "This fact sheet has been prepared to assist all types of agencies working together as part of the integrated family violence system in making decisions about information sharing in the context of responding to family violence. Information sharing is a central component of effective risk management, as identified in the Victorian Family Violence Risk Assessment and Risk Management Framework (2007). This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the Framework, alongside specific sector Standards and Codes of Practice and relevant legislation."

  • Wendt, S. (2010) Building and sustaining local co-ordination : an Australian rural community responds to domestic and family violence.British Journal of Social Work v. 40 rno. 1: 44-62. [html]

    This article describes an action research project in Murray Bridge, rural South Australia, to improve local service responses to domestic violence. The project involved service providers and past clients, and looked at barriers to service co-ordination and Indigenous services.

  • Women With Disabilities Australia (2007) WWDA Resource Manual on Violence Against Women with Disabilities, including More Than Just a Ramp: A Guide for Women's Refuges to Develop Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) Action Plans [html]
  • From the Website: "In late November 2007, Women With Disabilities Australia (WWDA) published its Resource Manual on Violence Against Women With Disabilities. The Manual is made up of four booklets and these are:

    1.  ‘A Life Like Mine! – Narratives from women with disabilities who experience violence’
    2.  ‘Forgotten Sisters – A global review of violence against women with disabilities’
    3.  ‘It’s Not Ok It’s Violence – Information about domestic violence and women with disabilities’
    4.  ‘More Than Just A Ramp – A guide for women’s refuges to develop disability discrimination act action plans’

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For other services

  • Family Violence Reform Coordination Unit, Victoria (2009) Family Violence Risk Assessment and Risk Management: Information Sharing in the Context of Family Violence Fact Sheet. [doc]

    From the Fact Sheet: "This fact sheet has been prepared to assist all types of agencies working together as part of the integrated family violence system in making decisions about information sharing in the context of responding to family violence. Information sharing is a central component of effective risk management, as identified in the Victorian Family Violence Risk Assessment and Risk Management Framework (2007). This fact sheet should be read in conjunction with the Framework, alongside specific sector Standards and Codes of Practice and relevant legislation."

  • NT Families and Children, (2009) Mandatory Reporting of Domestic and Family Violence: A Toolkit to Help Service Providers Meet the New Reporting Obligations [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "This Toolkit is a work-in-progress that developed out of conversations and questions raised with the Domestic and Family Violence Policy Team in the Department of Health and Families while they were delivering information sessions about the new mandatory reporting obligations. Since March 2009, more than 90 information sessions have been delivered to over 1000 professionals across the NT, spanning the domestic and family violence, health, legal and community sectors. Due to the diverse audience, the content and language used in this document will need to be adapted to your workplace, particularly if you work in a remote setting or provide outreach services, so please make it your own. The Toolkit is designed so you can pull out sections of interest, or download relevant resources or examples from the on-line version available at www.stopfamilyviolence.nt.gov.au."

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