Resource Compendium: Violence and Women and Girls with Disabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Resources: Violence and Women and Girls with Disabilities

Information | Policy | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls with Disabilities
Women and Girls with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds

Information

  • Center for Research on Women with Disabilities (CROWD) (2009). Violence Against Women with Physical Disabilities: Final Report Submitted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Award Reference NO. R04=CCR614142). Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. [html]

    From the Overview: "Women with disabilities experience similar, if not greater, rates of emotional, physical, and sexual violence compared to non-disabled women; and they are more vulnerable to disability-related violence. The reaction of the general public, medical professionals, and disability-related service providers to information about violence against women with disabilities is often one of shock and disbelief, as if they believe that disability is somehow a protective factor against this epidemic social problem. Advocates and researchers in the field of disability, on the other hand, are bringing to light case studies and statistics that point to disability as a risk factor for intimate partner violence and sexual assault." Please note that this document has been developed for use in another country, where the policy and legislative framework may differ from the Australian context.

  • International Network of Women with Disabilities (INWWD) (2011) Violence Against Women with Disabilities. Barbara Faye Waxman Fiduccia Papers on Women and Girls with Disabilities, Center for Women Policy Studies. [pdf]
  • From the Introduction: "The aim of this Paper is to educate people about the violence experienced by women with disabilities, to make recommendations about what can be done by a variety of stakeholders to end violence against women with disabilities, to motivate agencies dealing with violence against women to include prevention of violence against women with disabilities in their work, and to empower women with disabilities to protect themselves against violence."

  • Stephanie Ortoleva & Hope Lewis (2012) Forgotten Sisters - A Report on Violence against Women with Disabilities: An Overview of its Nature, Scope, Causes and Consequences. Northeastern Public Law and Theory Faculty Research Papers Series No. 104-2012. [pdf]

    From the Introduction: "This report reviews available information on the forms, causes and consequences of violence against women when both gender and disability collide to exacerbate that violence; examines the impact of the multiple and intersecting dimensions of women's lives and; their impact on violence against women with disabilities. The Report outlines the international and regional legal framework, highlighting relevant provisions and interpretations. Finally, the Report examines the extent to which States have met their due diligence obligations (setting forth a few country-specific case studies) highlights some best practices, discusses significant gaps in the research and makes recommendations for future action." Highly comprehensive international survey.

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Policy

  • Commonwealth of Australia (2009) Time for Action: The National Council's Plan for Australia to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children, 2009-2021. The National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. [pdf] [html]

    From the Executive Summary: "The National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children (the Council) conducted extensive research and a jurisdictional 'As Is' analysis to support its Time for Action: The National Council's Plan for Australia to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children ( the Plan of Action)."

  • Commonwealth of Australia (2009) A Snapshot to Time for Action: The National Council's Plan for Australia to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children, 2009-2021. The National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. [pdf] [html]

From the DSS website: "The National Plan marks a significant milestone in the collaboration of all Australian governments and the wider community to work together to reduce violence against women and children in this country."

  • Commonwealth of Australia (2009) The Costs of Violence against Women and their Children. The National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children. [pdf] [html]

    From the overview: "Violence against women and their children will cost the Australian economy an estimated $13.6 billion thisyear. Without appropriate action to address violence against women and their children, an estimated three-quarters of a million Australian women will experience and report violence in the period of 2021-22, costing the Australian economy an estimated $15.6 billion. This is more than last year's $10.4 billion plan by the Australian Government to stimulate the economy in the face of the global financial crisis; more than the Government's $5.9 billion Education Revolution; and more than three-quarters of the initial budget allocation in 2008-09 of $20 billion to its Building Australia Fund."

  • Commonwealth of Australia (2010) National Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children 2010-2022. Council of Australian Governments. [html] [pdf] [rtf]

From the DSS website: "The National Plan marks a significant milestone in the collaboration of all Australian governments and the wider community to work together to reduce violence against women and children in this country."

  • Commonwealth of Australia (2011) National Disability Strategy 2010-2020. Council of Australian Governments. [pdf] [pdf - Easy English] [doc]

    From the DSS website: "The National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 sets out a ten year national policy framework for improving life for Australians with disability, their families and carers. It represents a commitment by all levels of government, industry and the community to a unified, national approach to policy and program development. This new approach will assist in addressing the challenges faced by people with disability, both now and into the future."

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women and Girls with Disabilities

  • (2011) At the Coal Face with Jody Saxton-Barney. Queensland Centre for Domestic and Family Violence Research. CDFVRe@der v. 10 no. 1 Sep 2011: 15-16. [pdf]

    Jody Saxton-Barney is a deaf Aboriginal woman, a mother and grandmother in Victoria, and an advocate against domestic violence. In this interview, she discusses her role and work as a community leader, and issues for service delivery to disabled women.

  • Australian Capital Territory Office of the Victims of Crime Coordinator (2009) We Don't Shoot Our Wounded: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Victims of Family Violence Access to Justice and Access to Services in the ACT. Victims of Crime Coordinator. [pdf]

    From the Executive Summary: "Family violence in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander communities has a high and sometimes controversial profile. Governments and communities across Australia have debated causes, consequences and interventions for many years. The voices of the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander victims of family violence - what they have experienced, how they have sought help and to what effect, and what they think should be done - have too often been marginalised in these debates."

  • Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention and Legal Service Victoria. [html]

    From the website: The Aboriginal Family Violence Prevention and Legal Service Victoria (FVPLS Victoria) provides assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims/survivors of family violence and sexual assault and works with families and communities affected by violence.

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Women and Girls with Disabilities from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds

  • Cockram, Judith (2003) Silent Voices: Women with Disabilities and Family and Domestic Violence. Western Australia: People with Disabilities (WA) Inc, Ethnic Disability Advocacy Centre (WA) and Centre for Social Research, Edith Cowan University. [html]

    From the Introduction: "Family and domestic violence is widespread and complex. It is a major issue which results in substantial personal, social, financial and health related costs… However, there has been very little research on domestic violence against women with disabilities. The risk for abuse that women with disabilities face, the direct and indirect effects of abuse on their health, and their barriers to seeking help remain largely undocumented. In addition, information about the experiences of abuse that women with disabilities face across cultures, disability types, and locales is extremely limited."

  • Multicultural Disability Advocacy Association (2010) Violence Through Our Eyes: Improving Access to Services for Women from Non-English Speaking Backgrounds with Disability and Carers Experiencing Violence Project Report. [pdf] [doc]

    From the Executive Summary: "Individual Advocates at MDAA had noted a significant number of women with disability and women who are carers of children with disability reporting experiences of violence. MDAA conducted this project in order to gain a greater understanding of these experiences and of the barriers faced by these women when trying to access services. A series of forums were held with women from NESB with disability and carers who had experienced violence. The women identified barriers in accessing services and developed strategies to improve access."

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